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Fearless Instructional Design: Learning From the Imagination of Jim Henson

TechKnowledge 2015 FR200
Michelle Lentz | January 16, 2015 | Video

Too often, instructional designers end up trapped in their boxes of theory. Sometimes we need to open that box and peer outside to glean ideas and inspiration from sources outside our industry. Jim Henson started working as a puppeteer in 1954, long before many of us considered corporate instructional design (ID) as a career. Yet, Jim Henson applied many of the core ideas from ID in his imaginative work. Viewing our own theories and ideas used in different ways is a great way to help inspire us to think of new and fearless ideas. We will cover Henson's use of storyboarding, storytelling, iteration, templates, and more, and bring it back to practical uses in instructional design. We'll get creative, discussing how construction of a Muppet can translate to construction of a course. Also, this session is fun. There might even be a Muppet.

Everything I Ever Needed to Know About Simulations I Learned From Video Games

TechKnowledge 2015 TH103
Bianca Woods | January 15, 2015 | Video

We know that simulations are a fantastic way to allow people to practice skills in a realistic, but safe environment that gives them the opportunity to learn from mistakes. However, actually sitting down and creating a simulation that feels real to your audience is definitely harder than it sounds. So why not learn from the industry that's been successfully simulating real and imagined situations for years: video games! Sure, video games are a fun diversion, but there's also a lot in common with how they're created and the way a strong simulation should be designed. In this session, we'll take a look at how video games developers have overcome some of the same major hurdles that we experience when developing simulations for training, such as deciding what your simulation structure should be, narrowing down potential ideas to just the ones that work, and making player choices matter (or at least seem like they matter). You'll also learn about game design techniques that will make your simulation development process run smoother, such as iterative design and prototyping. Whether you're a seasoned gamer or someone who couldn't recognize Pong if your life depended on it, you'll still learn a lot about what video games can teach us about making simulations that are fun and effective.

Performance Support: Are We Missing a Huge Opportunity?

ATD 2014 Session: M302
Bob Mosher | May 05, 2014 | Video

Did you know that within the first 48 hours of your employees attending a traditional training or learning event, their knowledge retention drops to 33 percent? Did you also know that research now shows that nearly 80 percent of learning in the workplace takes place informally? So why are training departments still spending the vast majority of their budgets on formal training efforts? This session will address the methodologies behind performance support (learning while doing), and how it is now, more than ever, all around us!

Four Ways to Use Digital Curation in Learning

ATD 2014 Session: SU117
Ben Betts | May 04, 2014 | Video

The world is full of rich content. We just need to put it to use. Digital curation could hold the key to how we deliver 'more for less.' We can curate content to help inspire our employees and our customers, or to help us design and deliver more formal learning experiences using a wide range of content that we didn't necessarily produce 'in-house.' In this session we will consider digital curation in four broad roles within L&D: inspiration, instruction, integration, and application. Inspiration is what we call curation that is done by other people on your behalf, outside of a formal learning environment. Instruction is the same thing, but done within a formal learning context. Integration is a more personal curation process; how individuals blend new learning experiences with existing thoughts. And finally, application is how individuals apply new insights in the real world; how we individually manage knowledge on a day-to-day basis. Using a blend of these techniques we will work together to understand potential strategies for using more digital curation within your L&D context.

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