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Facilitation Basics

Chapter 1-5
Donald V. McCain, Deborah D. Tobey | October 06, 2015 | Book Chapter

Use facilitation techniques to communicate salient concepts successfully and help ensure the transfer of learning. Facilitation Basics details the principles of learning facilitation and how you apply them to a real-life classroom setting. You will learn how to create a learning climate, incorporate group activities, manage difficult participants, use media to support your messages, and assess end-of-program results.

Science of Learning 101: Are We Doing the Right Things?

Patti Shank | June 15, 2015 | Article

continuous learningCurrently, corporate learning and development (L&D) is still skewed heavily toward building courses and content, but this approach is not really in sync with the exponential rate of knowledge change and today’s knowledge-heavy work processes—or the instructional piece work L&D provides.  Consequently, L&D is dangerously close to becoming irrelevant in many organizations.  

ILT Program Evaluation Form

February 01, 2015 | Tool

Use this template to gather participant feedback about the objectives, content, and facilitator of your ILT program. 

Fearless Instructional Design: Learning From the Imagination of Jim Henson

TechKnowledge 2015 FR200
Michelle Lentz | January 16, 2015 | Video

Too often, instructional designers end up trapped in their boxes of theory. Sometimes we need to open that box and peer outside to glean ideas and inspiration from sources outside our industry. Jim Henson started working as a puppeteer in 1954, long before many of us considered corporate instructional design (ID) as a career. Yet, Jim Henson applied many of the core ideas from ID in his imaginative work. Viewing our own theories and ideas used in different ways is a great way to help inspire us to think of new and fearless ideas. We will cover Henson's use of storyboarding, storytelling, iteration, templates, and more, and bring it back to practical uses in instructional design. We'll get creative, discussing how construction of a Muppet can translate to construction of a course. Also, this session is fun. There might even be a Muppet.

A New Approach to Digital Learning Content

TechKnowledge 2015 Session: TH207
Robert Todd | January 15, 2015 | Video

After spending 20 years leading insanely talented teams trying to create the perfect approach to e-learning, the speaker finally gave up and started over. In this session the speaker will share (painful) lessons learned from leading a small team in a three year project to build a new approach to digital learning.   You'll learn a tool and technology agnostic approach to creating super-engaging, mobile-friendly, digital content that can support diverse needs: from structured learning to performance support to field exercises. Whether you're a learning leader or a learning developer, you'll laugh, you'll cry, and you'll walk out with the seven secrets of a new approach to digital learning content.

Using Mobile Technology to Make On-the-Job Learning Practical

TechKnowledge 2015 Session: W407
Marty Rosenheck | January 14, 2015 | Video

It's common knowledge in the talent development community that learning happens primarily on the job. The 70-20-10 framework states that only 10 percent of learning is formal classroom or e-learning, 20 percent is informal, and 70 percent is experiential. Despite its importance, on-the-job learning is rarely implemented in a systematic way, because it tends to be haphazard, inefficient, and difficult to manage and track. In this session you'll learn how cognitive apprenticeship principles implemented through emerging technologies can finally make on-the-job learning a practical reality. Cognitive apprenticeship combines the best of the traditional apprenticeship model with principles based on cognitive research on learning. The result is a set of guidelines for accelerating the process of developing skills. Mobile technologies, experience API (Tin Can), and badges have made it practical to implement on-the-job learning. You'll see examples of how an on-the-job learning path was deployed on employees' smartphones. They accessed video modeling and performance support when needed. They also used their phone's sensors (camera, audio, video, and GPS) to capture evidence of work and submit it to coaches for feedback and guidance. The experience API enabled tracking, learning analytics, and the awarding of badges. You'll see the results of a pilot study of the technology-supported, on-the-job learning process, and hear lessons learned that you can apply in your organization.

Visual Explanations: How to Describe and Clarify With Graphics

TechKnowledge 2015 Session: W400
Connie Malamed | January 14, 2015 | Video

People are wired to understand visuals. Research shows that when you use relevant graphics to explain, clarify, and enhance content, it typically improves learning. In this session, we will explore the most effective graphics to use for various types of content. Then the speaker will discuss design tips for each format, showing what enhances the message and what obscures it. These techniques will make you more conscious of how to design with intention, so that your graphics are understood accurately and are aesthetically pleasing.

Common Sense for the E-Learning Designer

TechKnowledge 2015 Session: W300
Ethan Edwards | January 14, 2015 | Video

It seems that the shared perspective of learners and designers about e-learning is that much of it is not very good: it's boring, the interactions don't teach, the media is unhelpful, and so on. This is in spite of the fact that well-meaning designers are following long-established models and doing exactly what most authoring tools have made easy. When pushed, many designers know that what they are doing is flawed, but there's little guidance to do anything better. Many e-learning solutions are not complex or difficult to achieve—mainly what is needed is a focus on the essential aspects of learning that have been overlooked in the haste to rely on technology alone. In this session, you will learn 10 straightforward and powerful principles to guide e-learning design. The principles focus on issues of feedback, learner actions, usefulness of templates, motivation, risk, and content. Appropriate to any content and applicable to any authoring tool, these principles will empower designers to make concrete design changes that improve the impact of their e-learning courses.

Mobile Learning: YouTube Style

TechKnowledge 2015 Session: W108
Sarah Gilbert | January 14, 2015 | Video

Many organizations want to provide small chunks of on-demand, just-in-time performance support that require minimal technical skills to create. Likewise, capturing and sharing tacit knowledge is becoming a top priority. Is it possible to create a solution that will both engage the learner and that can be measured and evaluated? In this session, participants will learn how to create quick, effective mobile learning through YouTube-style videos. Using real examples of successful videos as discussion points, you will learn simple tips to incorporate when developing tutorials using different levels of rapid-development tools. We will also discuss publishing formats and using comments to engage the learner and capture feedback. You'll leave with ideas to develop various types of video tutorials and make them available to learners within your organization. The steps and examples demonstrated will provide practical ideas for implementing video as part of a mobile learning strategy. In this session with, you will learn: better practices for creating YouTube-style tutorials; practical ways to implement video as part of a mobile-learning strategy;  tricks to engaging your learner with video; and reliable, easy ways to make video accessible on mobile devices.

Science of Learning 101: What’s the Point of Instruction?

Patti Shank | January 08, 2015 | Article

Patti Shank discusses why numerous disciplines (neuroscience, psychology, education, computer science, and others) expend enormous energy and resources to figure out how we learn and how to best build instruction?

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