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Interactive E-Learning Design With Sketching and Prototyping (Part 1): Intro and Design Strategy

Ethan Edwards | March 04, 2016 | Video

Ethan Edwards presented "Interactive E-Learning Design With Sketching and Protoyping," filmed January 14, 2016, at ATD's TechKnowledge conference in Las Vegas. In this segment, Ethan Edwards presents various design strategies for instructional design. The video is a portion of his presentation at TechKnowledge, "Interactive E-Learning Design With Sketching and Protoyping," filmed January 14, 2016, in Las Vegas.

Revitalizing Role Play

ATD International Conference & Expo 2015 (SU215)
Linda Smith, Dawn Holzer | May 17, 2015 | Video

How many times have you heard, 'We hate to role play!'? Many trainers have given up on this tried-and-true technique. It has been done poorly for so long that role play has gotten a bad reputation. We're here to restore its image and add this valuable learning technique back to your toolbox. You will leave the session with a clearly defined process for better role plays, as well as new techniques to ensure your learners are better equipped to transfer skills back to the workplace--making it not just a training technique, but a true tool for talent development. This course is targeted to those new to training or as a refresher for seasoned workplace learning professionals who are frustrated with their current use of role plays in the training classroom.

Making the Leap: The Pivotal Role of Training in AT&T's Acquisition of Cricket

TechKnowledge 2015 TH206
Tad Kozak | January 15, 2015 | Video

When AT&T acquired Leap Wireless (which operated the Cricket brand), AT&T announced it would merge Cricket with AT&T's Aio Wireless to become 'the new Cricket,' with a goal for the two to operate as one within 60 days. This session will describe the aggressive training initiative for 10,000 Cricket retail employees. The speaker, a veteran of three AT&T mergers, applied many lessons learned when designing the Cricket training initiative and added a newly developed, mobile performance support tool to emphasize just-in-time information. All resources foster self-sufficiency and were optimized for smartphone use, the primary tools for retail employees. Components of the training initiative included one day of instructor-led training focusing on the new Cricket brand and culture, to supplement an internal instructor staff, Aio worked with Wounded Warriors and other groups to hire 38 veterans as temporary instructors. A suite of WBTs and simulations covered compliance and privacy issues, network and device training, point-of-sale system guidance, and customer support. The program incorporated a performance support tool for use on the sales floor to rapidly access the information needed to handle real-time customer questions and a step-by-step guide for all major systems transactions. The speaker will describe how his team designed and tested the program within a tight timeline, the supporting technologies used to manage and deliver resources, and the ongoing role of collaboration and social learning within the new organization.

Everything I Ever Needed to Know About Simulations I Learned From Video Games

TechKnowledge 2015 TH103
Bianca Woods | January 15, 2015 | Video

We know that simulations are a fantastic way to allow people to practice skills in a realistic, but safe environment that gives them the opportunity to learn from mistakes. However, actually sitting down and creating a simulation that feels real to your audience is definitely harder than it sounds. So why not learn from the industry that's been successfully simulating real and imagined situations for years: video games! Sure, video games are a fun diversion, but there's also a lot in common with how they're created and the way a strong simulation should be designed. In this session, we'll take a look at how video games developers have overcome some of the same major hurdles that we experience when developing simulations for training, such as deciding what your simulation structure should be, narrowing down potential ideas to just the ones that work, and making player choices matter (or at least seem like they matter). You'll also learn about game design techniques that will make your simulation development process run smoother, such as iterative design and prototyping. Whether you're a seasoned gamer or someone who couldn't recognize Pong if your life depended on it, you'll still learn a lot about what video games can teach us about making simulations that are fun and effective.

Common Sense for the E-Learning Designer

TechKnowledge 2015 Session: W300
Ethan Edwards | January 14, 2015 | Video

It seems that the shared perspective of learners and designers about e-learning is that much of it is not very good: it's boring, the interactions don't teach, the media is unhelpful, and so on. This is in spite of the fact that well-meaning designers are following long-established models and doing exactly what most authoring tools have made easy. When pushed, many designers know that what they are doing is flawed, but there's little guidance to do anything better. Many e-learning solutions are not complex or difficult to achieve—mainly what is needed is a focus on the essential aspects of learning that have been overlooked in the haste to rely on technology alone. In this session, you will learn 10 straightforward and powerful principles to guide e-learning design. The principles focus on issues of feedback, learner actions, usefulness of templates, motivation, risk, and content. Appropriate to any content and applicable to any authoring tool, these principles will empower designers to make concrete design changes that improve the impact of their e-learning courses.

Using Mobile Technology to Make On-the-Job Learning Practical

TechKnowledge 2015 Session: W407
Marty Rosenheck | January 14, 2015 | Video

It's common knowledge in the talent development community that learning happens primarily on the job. The 70-20-10 framework states that only 10 percent of learning is formal classroom or e-learning, 20 percent is informal, and 70 percent is experiential. Despite its importance, on-the-job learning is rarely implemented in a systematic way, because it tends to be haphazard, inefficient, and difficult to manage and track. In this session you'll learn how cognitive apprenticeship principles implemented through emerging technologies can finally make on-the-job learning a practical reality. Cognitive apprenticeship combines the best of the traditional apprenticeship model with principles based on cognitive research on learning. The result is a set of guidelines for accelerating the process of developing skills. Mobile technologies, experience API (Tin Can), and badges have made it practical to implement on-the-job learning. You'll see examples of how an on-the-job learning path was deployed on employees' smartphones. They accessed video modeling and performance support when needed. They also used their phone's sensors (camera, audio, video, and GPS) to capture evidence of work and submit it to coaches for feedback and guidance. The experience API enabled tracking, learning analytics, and the awarding of badges. You'll see the results of a pilot study of the technology-supported, on-the-job learning process, and hear lessons learned that you can apply in your organization.

Media Competencies for Talent Professionals

TechKnowledge 2015 Session: W202
Jonathan Halls | January 14, 2015 | Video

Video is the new flipchart. No longer will the marker pen and flipchart pad be the primary medium that trainers use to aid learning. As talent professionals continue to expand their classroom beyond brick-and-mortar to smartphones, tablets, and desktops, their flipchart will become video and audio. The trainers who will be in demand in five years time will be talent professionals who have well-developed media competencies in the use of audio, video, online text, animation, and database content.   As media content for learning goes beyond novelty to fact of life, in-demand professionals will need to create content that is professional, engaging, focused, and linked to a learning objective or business need. So how do we get there? This session will explore the key skills learning professionals should start developing now to be competitive in a future where content creation skills are essential. It will look at competencies from broadcasting and newspapers that can be applied to a learning environment and how they work together with training skills so talent professionals can affordably and rapidly create high quality learning media. 

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