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Before and After: Making a Difference With Pre- and Post-Event Learning Activities

TechKnowledge 2015 Session: W206
Chris Van Wingerden | January 14, 2015 | Video

Have you ever tested spaghetti to see if it's cooked by throwing it against a wall? That's how too many organizations now approach their training programs—throwing standalone e-learning or face-to-face courses at their staff and hoping the learning will stick. But no course is an island, and there are things we can do to increase the odds of making learning stick by augmenting standalone courses. Pre- and post-event activities have been proven to make a dramatic difference in learning transfer rates. Many of these strategies are easy to implement and are very suited to m-learning approaches, giving us a whole new set of tools to improve the effectiveness of learning events. In this session we will provide an overview of what pre- and post-event learning transfer activities are, and review what the research tells us about their effectiveness. We'll also discuss strategies for including these in the planning and design of your learning programs, as well as focus on techniques to take advantage of mobile devices for delivering many of these activities.

Common Sense for the E-Learning Designer

TechKnowledge 2015 Session: W300
Ethan Edwards | January 14, 2015 | Video

It seems that the shared perspective of learners and designers about e-learning is that much of it is not very good: it's boring, the interactions don't teach, the media is unhelpful, and so on. This is in spite of the fact that well-meaning designers are following long-established models and doing exactly what most authoring tools have made easy. When pushed, many designers know that what they are doing is flawed, but there's little guidance to do anything better. Many e-learning solutions are not complex or difficult to achieve—mainly what is needed is a focus on the essential aspects of learning that have been overlooked in the haste to rely on technology alone. In this session, you will learn 10 straightforward and powerful principles to guide e-learning design. The principles focus on issues of feedback, learner actions, usefulness of templates, motivation, risk, and content. Appropriate to any content and applicable to any authoring tool, these principles will empower designers to make concrete design changes that improve the impact of their e-learning courses.

The Accidental Instructional Designer

ATD 2014 Session: M209
Cammy Bean | May 05, 2014 | Video

Chances are, you didn't dream of becoming an e-learning designer when you grew up, did you? Most of the instructional designers in the e-learning business got here by accident. So now that you're here and doing this work, how can you become a more intentional practitioner? We'll take a look at four key areas to focus on in order to become a well-rounded e-learning designer, talk about ways that you can take your practice to the next level, and share some quick tips for better e-learning design.

User Experience Design for Learning

ATD 2014 Session: SU309
Julie Dirksen | May 04, 2014 | Video

Sometimes you use a technology product or a website and the experience is terrible. Other times you breeze through the experience and it's practically seamless to accomplish what you want to do. The difference is probably because the better experience was created following User Experience Design. User Experience Design is dedicated to understanding the end user. Through analysis techniques like field study observation and persona development, as well as user-testing methods, such as usability testing and heuristic evaluation, User Experience Design is dedicated to creating the best possible experience for each individual user. User Experience Design can help learning designers better understand their users' abilities, contexts, and constraints. Cost effective strategies like rapid usability testing can significantly improve learning design. Additionally, good usability can decrease a learner's extraneous cognitive load, thereby increasing the available attention for the actual learning content.

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