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Interactive E-Learning Design With Sketching and Prototyping (Part 1): Intro and Design Strategy

Ethan Edwards | March 04, 2016 | Video

Ethan Edwards presented "Interactive E-Learning Design With Sketching and Protoyping," filmed January 14, 2016, at ATD's TechKnowledge conference in Las Vegas. In this segment, Ethan Edwards presents various design strategies for instructional design. The video is a portion of his presentation at TechKnowledge, "Interactive E-Learning Design With Sketching and Protoyping," filmed January 14, 2016, in Las Vegas.

Going Mobile: An ATD Infographic

Sarah Gilbert | February 11, 2015 | Article

This ATD infographic highlights recent data surrounding mobile learning. 

Everything I Ever Needed to Know About Simulations I Learned From Video Games

TechKnowledge 2015 TH103
Bianca Woods | January 15, 2015 | Video

We know that simulations are a fantastic way to allow people to practice skills in a realistic, but safe environment that gives them the opportunity to learn from mistakes. However, actually sitting down and creating a simulation that feels real to your audience is definitely harder than it sounds. So why not learn from the industry that's been successfully simulating real and imagined situations for years: video games! Sure, video games are a fun diversion, but there's also a lot in common with how they're created and the way a strong simulation should be designed. In this session, we'll take a look at how video games developers have overcome some of the same major hurdles that we experience when developing simulations for training, such as deciding what your simulation structure should be, narrowing down potential ideas to just the ones that work, and making player choices matter (or at least seem like they matter). You'll also learn about game design techniques that will make your simulation development process run smoother, such as iterative design and prototyping. Whether you're a seasoned gamer or someone who couldn't recognize Pong if your life depended on it, you'll still learn a lot about what video games can teach us about making simulations that are fun and effective.

Using Mobile Technology to Make On-the-Job Learning Practical

TechKnowledge 2015 Session: W407
Marty Rosenheck | January 14, 2015 | Video

It's common knowledge in the talent development community that learning happens primarily on the job. The 70-20-10 framework states that only 10 percent of learning is formal classroom or e-learning, 20 percent is informal, and 70 percent is experiential. Despite its importance, on-the-job learning is rarely implemented in a systematic way, because it tends to be haphazard, inefficient, and difficult to manage and track. In this session you'll learn how cognitive apprenticeship principles implemented through emerging technologies can finally make on-the-job learning a practical reality. Cognitive apprenticeship combines the best of the traditional apprenticeship model with principles based on cognitive research on learning. The result is a set of guidelines for accelerating the process of developing skills. Mobile technologies, experience API (Tin Can), and badges have made it practical to implement on-the-job learning. You'll see examples of how an on-the-job learning path was deployed on employees' smartphones. They accessed video modeling and performance support when needed. They also used their phone's sensors (camera, audio, video, and GPS) to capture evidence of work and submit it to coaches for feedback and guidance. The experience API enabled tracking, learning analytics, and the awarding of badges. You'll see the results of a pilot study of the technology-supported, on-the-job learning process, and hear lessons learned that you can apply in your organization.

Common Sense for the E-Learning Designer

TechKnowledge 2015 Session: W300
Ethan Edwards | January 14, 2015 | Video

It seems that the shared perspective of learners and designers about e-learning is that much of it is not very good: it's boring, the interactions don't teach, the media is unhelpful, and so on. This is in spite of the fact that well-meaning designers are following long-established models and doing exactly what most authoring tools have made easy. When pushed, many designers know that what they are doing is flawed, but there's little guidance to do anything better. Many e-learning solutions are not complex or difficult to achieve—mainly what is needed is a focus on the essential aspects of learning that have been overlooked in the haste to rely on technology alone. In this session, you will learn 10 straightforward and powerful principles to guide e-learning design. The principles focus on issues of feedback, learner actions, usefulness of templates, motivation, risk, and content. Appropriate to any content and applicable to any authoring tool, these principles will empower designers to make concrete design changes that improve the impact of their e-learning courses.

Three Mysterious Keys to Interactive Learning: Game-Thinking, Game-Elements, and Gamification

ATD 2014 Session: W101
Karl M. Kapp | May 07, 2014 | Video

The terms game-thinking, game-elements, and gamification have all entered into the vocabulary of trainers, e-learning developers, and instructional designers in the past few years. But what do these terms really mean and how can you apply them to create interactive learning events that change behavior and improve performance? How can you make your instruction more game-like without the cost and effort of creating a large-scale game? However, we have to think about a few things. How should games-thinking be integrated into the curriculum? Can attitudes and behavior change as a result of playing a game? What elements can learning designers borrow from game designers? What is the one secret game designers know that instructional designers never seem to grasp? The answer to these questions, and more, are not all that mysterious and can be found in the research and in uncommon best practices. Based on the bestselling book, The Gamification of Learning and Instruction, this interactive session includes many examples of using game-elements, game-thinking, and gamification to promote learning for performance improvement and highlights how organizations have added game thinking to their toolkit. And, yes, you will play a polling game in this session. Discover how research-based practices and game-thinking fit in with today's fast-paced need for quick, effective instruction.

The Accidental Instructional Designer

ATD 2014 Session: M209
Cammy Bean | May 05, 2014 | Video

Chances are, you didn't dream of becoming an e-learning designer when you grew up, did you? Most of the instructional designers in the e-learning business got here by accident. So now that you're here and doing this work, how can you become a more intentional practitioner? We'll take a look at four key areas to focus on in order to become a well-rounded e-learning designer, talk about ways that you can take your practice to the next level, and share some quick tips for better e-learning design.

Performance Support: Are We Missing a Huge Opportunity?

ATD 2014 Session: M302
Bob Mosher | May 05, 2014 | Video

Did you know that within the first 48 hours of your employees attending a traditional training or learning event, their knowledge retention drops to 33 percent? Did you also know that research now shows that nearly 80 percent of learning in the workplace takes place informally? So why are training departments still spending the vast majority of their budgets on formal training efforts? This session will address the methodologies behind performance support (learning while doing), and how it is now, more than ever, all around us!

Four Ways to Use Digital Curation in Learning

ATD 2014 Session: SU117
Ben Betts | May 04, 2014 | Video

The world is full of rich content. We just need to put it to use. Digital curation could hold the key to how we deliver 'more for less.' We can curate content to help inspire our employees and our customers, or to help us design and deliver more formal learning experiences using a wide range of content that we didn't necessarily produce 'in-house.' In this session we will consider digital curation in four broad roles within L&D: inspiration, instruction, integration, and application. Inspiration is what we call curation that is done by other people on your behalf, outside of a formal learning environment. Instruction is the same thing, but done within a formal learning context. Integration is a more personal curation process; how individuals blend new learning experiences with existing thoughts. And finally, application is how individuals apply new insights in the real world; how we individually manage knowledge on a day-to-day basis. Using a blend of these techniques we will work together to understand potential strategies for using more digital curation within your L&D context.

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