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Filtered By: X (remove/delete) 1982 X (remove/delete) 2003   Clear All

Whats Next

Chris Taylor | December 01, 2003 | TD Magazine Archive

The article presents responses of 10 different economists to questions regarding the state of the U.S. economy and how that will affect business and training budget. Economist Gus Faucher pointed out that the last few quarters have finally seen some small up-ticks in certain business investments, such as software. "It's not perfect yet, and there are still some bumps in the road," says David Wyss, chief economist for Standard & Poor's. "But everyone's getting more confident that this pickup really is happening."

Whats Next December 2003

Chris Taylor | December 01, 2003 | TD Magazine Archive

The article focuses on the state of the U.S. economy. Economists feel that economic fundamentals are improving that means one can expect to see positive effects, such as increased hiring, business spending and better wages, soon. The housing market, which continued to boom in the past few years, is still in pretty good shape. But the author warns that rising interest rates and accounting troubles at lenders combined with high jobless figures and foreclosure rates, could indicate trouble for the future.

When the Shark Bites

Craig R. Taylor | December 01, 2003 | TD Magazine Archive

The article focuses on the author's experience of a shark bite and the importance of keeping one's cool in a difficult situation instead of panicking. According to the author, right before the shark chomped down on his foot, he had a "bad karma" feeling. The author was sitting on a surfboard off the coast of Florida when he was attacked. The author said that he was out in the ocean with a badly bleeding foot and a hungry, 6-foot shark circling below. This experience prompted him to reflect on lessons that one can learn from surprises.

The Future of the Profession Formerly Known as Training

Pat Galagan | December 01, 2003 | TD Magazine Archive

According to the author, there is no topic that inflames more passion at the moment than what to call the profession formerly known as training. In a recent online discussion about what to call a document describing competencies for the field, the author read this amazing statement: "Under no circumstances should the word 'training' appear in the title." Here is how Pat McLagan — CEO of McLagan International, an authority on competencies in the field explains it, "If we are to be effective, our views and theories of organization must change."

The Lowdown on Updates

William Powell | December 01, 2003 | TD Magazine Archive

The article focuses on views of the author regarding criticism leveled against Microsoft Corp. and its related products. According to the author, the steady issue of updates for vulnerabilities in Windows and Internet Explorer has chewed up his evenings as he waited patiently for the 56K modem to download the proper security patches and fixes. Most of the casual computer users are not aware of the fact that programs that they use on a daily basis could have severe design flaws that could relinquish the control of their computer to hackers. To Microsoft's credit, it has been quick to fix flaws in a product's security once it has been discovered, though some people would object to a product being released with such flaws in the first place.

NEDS Carpal Tunnel of the Mind

December 01, 2003 | TD Magazine Archive

The article presents information on New Economy Depression Syndrome (NEDS). The process from stress to breakdown to self-medication is a downward spiral of increased expropriation of expertise and social interaction to technology. This is best understood in a workplace scenario as carpel tunnel of the mind. It's estimated that 4 to 6 million people may be suffering from NEDS and may be at risk for heart disease, stroke, unemployment, divorce and drug and alcohol abuse. More research is being taken up in this field.

Ten StressRelief Tips

December 01, 2003 | TD Magazine Archive

The article focuses on suggestions for calming workers and managers submitted by the American Management Association and compiled from the content of their seminars. Some of these are, to pace oneself and help one's employees do the same, to calm the body and soul by taking a walk, to work on tough projects when one is most productive and least harried, one may not be able to achieve the goal one had set 20 years ago. Avoiding high-pressure lunches is also suggested. Instead one should go to lunch with friends or go alone.

Training Program of the Month

December 01, 2003 | TD Magazine Archive

Facial expressions can be deceptive, and micro expressions that flash on a face for less than a 15[supth] of a second can be easily missed. This article highlights aspects of a new training program which can train one to recognise subtle facial expressions. The Micro Expression Training Tool and Subtle Expression Training Tool are CD-ROMs that can help people recognize subtle expressions and the emotions they convey. Most people start the training with an accuracy rate of 50 to 60 percent. After completing it, they reach a rate of 80 to 85 percent.

RATINGS December 2003

December 01, 2003 | TD Magazine Archive

The article presents a blended learning solution "Manager's Mindset," that is designed to change the mindset of managers and improve their people management skills. It introduces a set of management principles and guidelines and then uses a variety of formats to present, practice and provide feedback about the new skills. Manager's Mindset online learning combined with classroom component is a powerful and well-organized learning model. It has a great deal of feedback and practice built into the design that can lead to positive results. The Mindset principles are simple and straightforward to implement.

The Future of the Profession Formerly Known as Training December 2003

Pat Galagan | December 01, 2003 | TD Magazine Archive

The article focuses on the future of the training. There's no topic that inflames more passion at the moment than what to call the profession formerly known as training. People who believe the field is fragmenting offer the explanation that it's undergoing a natural metamorphosis. Learning professionals responsible for business information are the new power elite, while outsourcing has made trainers an endangered species. There's no clear definition for the field. Learning, performance and change activities are happening under many different names.

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