TD at Work CoverSuccessful onboarding begins long before new employees walk in the door on their first day. For both the employee's benefit and the organization's, make sure that recruitment aligns with the company's purpose, priorities, and desired results. "Your organization is adding staff to achieve objectives, not to fill seats," write George Bradt and Mary Vonnegut in "Onboarding for Business Success."

The authors emphasize that the recruitment process is an opportunity for an organization to underscore its brand, which can play out in the tools and resources it uses to look for candidates. Consider, for example, a forward-looking tech company failing to use the latest in social media and websites to recruit.

Further, advise Bradt and Vonnegut, "coach managers to treat the offer as just one part of a strategic sale." Hiring managers should have the interviewing skill level so they can evaluate candidates and make a good impression. Candidates should feel that they are one part of a strategic partnership from the get-go.

New employees have a head start and get a great impression when the organization is ready for them. Not only are work needs such as a computer account and desk set up, but established employees should understand what the new employee brings to the organization and how he contributes to the overall mission.

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Think onboarding begins on day one? Think again.

These tips were adapted from the November 2017 issue of TD at Work.