It comes as no surprise that technology is changing the way companies operate, and this includes the way they train their workforces. With the rise in the number of Millennials entering the workforce, the potential for disruptive change is at an all-time high. Larry Pickett, CIO of Purdue Pharma, says younger workers caused him to rethink the way his company performs tech training. As the company deploys new cloud-based solutions to accelerate research and development, training, which was once performed in two-day sessions, has been broken down into bite-sized bits. One IT worker recommended the training be performed in 10-minute sessions monthly, and Pickett saw the utility in this. “They just don’t have the tolerance, the patience or the time to be able to do longer training,” Pickett says. Lindsey Pollak, a consultant serving as a Millennial workplace expert for financial services group The Hartford, says this is an argument she’s heard before. But it’s not that Millennials are lacking anything—it’s that they simply don’t care for tradition. "What Millennials invite us to do is take every practice—training being a huge example—and say 'what really works? Maybe it is time to rethink things we've been doing for 30 years,'" she says.
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