According to the 2015 Talent Mobility Research Report, only 42 percent of companies have a comprehensive grasp of their workers’ skills. When employers know what their employees do well, they can better tailor their training programs. These strength-based employee development programs are founded on the idea that some people are innately better at certain tasks and competencies than others, and that focusing on these strengths rather than trying to bolster weaknesses can create a strong, well-rounded team. In line with this idea, Gallup recently created the Strengths Orientation Index. It found that 37 percent of employees thought that their managers focused on their strengths, which led to 61 percent of these employees feeling engaged in their work. A different survey from Gallup found that strength-based companies saw better business outcomes, including more sales, higher profits, and increased customer satisfaction. Smart companies will use their employees' strengths to inform their professional development training. Those who are good at managing stress and time while maintaining a high level of performance would be good for leadership roles and should be tracked accordingly.
View Source: Entrepreneur