By the year 2020, a quarter of the American workforce will be over 55 and nearing retirement. It's feared that this “Silver Tsunami” will create a shortage of skilled workers in a number of technical fields, including electric utilities, telecommunications, and manufacturing. However, augmented reality (AR) training systems might be able to prevent a skills gap crisis by changing the way training is thought about and delivered. Last year, U.S. companies spent an average of $1,000 per employee on training, but with advancements like AR, these costs could be cut and traditional formats like classroom seminars might go by the wayside. The rise of machine learning and AR will allow for different, more effective types of training. First, AR offers real-time information. A maintenance worker can look at a particular piece of equipment through AR goggles and immediately bring up its diagnostics and repair procedures. This would make the need for retraining workers decrease over time. Additionally, AR allows the most skilled workers on a team the ability to solve problems remotely. Often, when an out-of-the-ordinary problem occurs, teams of experts need to be dispatched. However, with AR, top talent can work from a centralized location and literally see what field workers are looking at through augmented lenses.

View Source: Fortune Magazine