Any manager worth their salt knows that for employees to be successful, they have to be adequately trained; however, even organizations that embrace a culture of learning can make the mistake of thinking that training should be either experiential or theoretical, instead of a combination of both. In training, a lack of interaction will cause learners to become passive and demotivated. “Boring” training sessions are a waste of employee time and company resources and should be avoided at all costs. But this doesn’t mean that training sessions need to be filled with gimmicks to keep learners occupied. Instead, companies should structure training sessions to let employees practice their new skills and knowledge. Simply putting an employee through a course, workshop, or seminar one time doesn’t count as training, and many managers mistake exposure for education. Training requires ongoing exposure to material, as well as assessment and accountability. “With a highly trained staff,” Brad Lea, owner and founder of LightSpeed VT, explained, “you’ll see an increase in productivity, retention, customer satisfaction, reduced liability, fewer lawsuits, reduced expenses, and more. If you train effectively, you immediately see results.”

View Source: Forbes