It’s no surprise to anyone who's been paying attention that the American workforce is woefully disengaged. According to Gallup, only about a third of workers in the United States describe themselves as being engaged in their workplaces, meaning an estimated 66 percent of employees find themselves checked-out at least some of the time. Fixing this issue is complicated, and an overwhelming amount of information is available on the topic—sometimes helpful, sometimes not. However, in order to get to the heart of the issue, an important question needs to be answered. Who is responsible for engagement? The employees? The management? The executives? Long story short, the answer is yes. Everyone is responsible. There are many ways to get employees engaged, but everyone from the highest corner office to the smallest cubicle needs to be part of the effort. Leaders need to help their employees by offering meaningful feedback, providing employees with the right tools and resources to get their jobs done and allow autonomy to accomplish tasks effectively. Employees should focus on the energy they bring to the workplace. According to Dr. Arnold B. Bakker, a prominent researcher in the area of work engagement: "Enthusiastic employees excel in their work because they maintain the balance between the energy they give and the energy they receive."


It’s no surprise to anyone that’s been paying attention that the American workforce is woefully disengaged. According to Gallup, only about a third of workers in the U.S. describe themselves as being engaged in their workplaces, meaning an estimated 66 percent of employees find themselves checked-out at least some of the time. Fixing this issue is complicated, and overwhelming amounts of information is available on the topic – some helpful, some less than. However, in order to get to the heart of the issue, an important question needs to be answered. Who is responsible for engagement? The employees? The management? The executives? Long story short, the answer is yes. Everyone is responsible. There are many ways to get employees engaged, but everyone from the highest corner office to the smallest cubicle needs to be part of the effort. Leaders need to help their employees by offering meaningful feedback, providing employees with the right tools and resources to get their jobs done and allow autonomy to accomplish tasks effectively. Employees should focus on the energies they bring to their workplaces. According to Dr. Arnold B. Bakker, a prominent researcher in the area of work engagement: "Enthusiastic employees excel in their work because they maintain the balance between the energy they give and the energy they receive."
It’s no surprise to anyone that’s been paying attention that the American workforce is woefully disengaged. According to Gallup, only about a third of workers in the U.S. describe themselves as being engaged in their workplaces, meaning an estimated 66 percent of employees find themselves checked-out at least some of the time. Fixing this issue is complicated, and overwhelming amounts of information is available on the topic – some helpful, some less than. However, in order to get to the heart of the issue, an important question needs to be answered. Who is responsible for engagement? The employees? The management? The executives? Long story short, the answer is yes. Everyone is responsible. There are many ways to get employees engaged, but everyone from the highest corner office to the smallest cubicle needs to be part of the effort. Leaders need to help their employees by offering meaningful feedback, providing employees with the right tools and resources to get their jobs done and allow autonomy to accomplish tasks effectively. Employees should focus on the energies they bring to their workplaces. According to Dr. Arnold B. Bakker, a prominent researcher in the area of work engagement: "Enthusiastic employees excel in their work because they maintain the balance between the energy they give and the energy they receive."
It’s no surprise to anyone that’s been paying attention that the American workforce is woefully disengaged. According to Gallup, only about a third of workers in the U.S. describe themselves as being engaged in their workplaces, meaning an estimated 66 percent of employees find themselves checked-out at least some of the time. Fixing this issue is complicated, and overwhelming amounts of information is available on the topic – some helpful, some less than. However, in order to get to the heart of the issue, an important question needs to be answered. Who is responsible for engagement? The employees? The management? The executives? Long story short, the answer is yes. Everyone is responsible. There are many ways to get employees engaged, but everyone from the highest corner office to the smallest cubicle needs to be part of the effort. Leaders need to help their employees by offering meaningful feedback, providing employees with the right tools and resources to get their jobs done and allow autonomy to accomplish tasks effectively. Employees should focus on the energies they bring to their workplaces. According to Dr. Arnold B. Bakker, a prominent researcher in the area of work engagement: "Enthusiastic employees excel in their work because they maintain the balance between the energy they give and the energy they receive."
View Source: Forbes