Top
1.800.628.2783
1.800.628.2783
April 2020
Issue Map
QuickTips_April2020_TD.jpg
TD Magazine

4 Ways to Check for Leadership Blindspots

We all have blind spots—those things that others can see but are unknown to us. Sometimes, they are relatively harmless. But when leaders leave certain blind spots unchecked, it can be serious—not only for the leader but for employees and the organization. Here's how to catch those blind spots.

1. Ascertain whether people know the goals.

Advertisement

Many leaders wrongly assume that employees understand which organizational goals are most important. Don't assume; ask.

2. Share with people that what they do matters.

People need to understand how their daily work connects to the goals, vision, and strategy.

3. Leave it up to your employees to do their jobs.

Be careful not to think that you know how to best accomplish the work that helps a company meet its goals. Your people are much closer to the everyday work than you are.

Advertisement

4. Listen to learn what your employees find motivating.

Different things motivate people. Some leaders believe that if they personally find something motivating, their people will feel the same. What one person considers a reward, another thinks is far from positive recognition.

About the Author

Patrick Leddin has benefited from both hands-on leadership and management experience coupled with academic rigor and expertise. He served as a US Army airborne, infantry, ranger-qualified officer, worked as a project manager at KPMG Consulting, andalong with Jamie Leddinstarted and ran an Inc. 5000-recognized consulting firm.

His speaking engagements and consulting work have allowed him to partner with clients and present to countless audiences in the United States, Canada, China, Malaysia, Singapore, Great Britain, Aruba, Iceland, Germany, Denmark, Belgium, Guam, and many other countries around the world.

In addition to his work at Leddin Group, Leddin is an associate professor at Vanderbilt University, where he teaches corporate strategy, negotiation, and advanced marketing.

Be the first to comment
Sign In to Post a Comment
Sorry! Something went wrong on our end. Please try again later.