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October 2013
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TD Magazine
The E-Factor: Energy Equals Engagement

Zeal for work and play naturally results in higher career and life satisfaction.

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People with more energy are more satisfied and engaged with their careers and relationships, according to a recent study from the Institute for Professional Excellence in Coaching (iPEC). In partnership with statistical research and evaluation company Zajonc Corporation, iPEC assessed 1,361 participants in 14 key areas of life, including leadership ability, productivity, work-life balance, and communication skills.

Participants in the study took the Energy Leadership Index assessment, an online instrument that measures how an individual perceives and approaches work and life. Assessment results produce a numerical value referred to as the "E-Factor," which is an indicator of one's overall energetic composition.

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The study reveals that respondents with a high E-Factor are 100 percent satisfied with their working relationships, 93 percent satisfied with their level of engagement at work, and nearly 90 percent satisfied with their leadership ability and communication skills.

Their counterparts, however, reported only 13 percent satisfaction with their careers and a 6 percent satisfaction rate across the board when it came to communications skills, financial success, and leadership ability. This contrast reveals that the amount of energy and passion people put into their relationships and professional careers is proportional to the satisfaction they derive from them.

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With U.S. businesses losing $11 billion annually as a direct result of employee turnover, according to the Bureau of National Affairs, these findings can serve as a catalyst for companies to re-evaluate their corporate cultures, which should promote leadership, engagement, and energy among employees.

"Engagement stems from core energy, as measured by one's E-Factor, and in order to make effective changes to workforce engagement, core energy must shift," says Luke Iorio, iPEC president and CEO.

About the Author

Ryann K. Ellis is an editor for the Association of Talent Development (ATD). She has been covering workplace learning and performance for ATD (formerly the American Society for Training & Development) since 1995. She currently manages ATD's Community of Practice blogs, as well as ATD's government-focused magazine, The Public Manager. Contact her at rellis@td.org. 

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