Three-day weekends are a nice break for employees, but for some organizations these brief respites from the day-to-day grind are becoming more common. For an increasing number of companies, four-day workweeks are becoming the rule, rather than the exception. According to a study released by the Society for Human Resource Management, 43 percent of companies offer four-day workweeks to some employees, and 10 percent make them available to most or all workers. "Since we implemented flexible workweeks in 2008, all the metrics a CEO cares about have gone in the right direction," says Delta Emerson, president of global shared services for Ryan, a tax firm. Emerson explains the company’s turnover rate plummeted from 30 percent to 11 percent, revenue and profits have both nearly doubled, client satisfaction marks are at an all-time high, and the organization has received national recognition, winning several "best place to work" awards. And although there are myriad positive benefits of a compressed workweek, it still requires a decent amount of planning on the part of management to make it a success. Employee schedules should overlap, rules must be set, and flexibility must be built into the model.
View Source: Fast Company