The old adage that people quit their managers, not their jobs, was recently backed up by some pretty conclusive data. According to a new survey released by the American Psychological Association, managerial support can make or break an employee’s experience on the job. More than 1,000 U.S. workers were surveyed and asked to rate their supervisor’s support across a wide range of dynamics, and this support, the study found, strongly influenced employees’ career paths and organizational outcomes. The study revealed that employees with supportive bosses were twice as likely to feel valued in their position, twice as likely to feel satisfied with their job, and twice as likely to recommend the organization to their peers. On the other hand, employees who reported feeling unsupported by their supervisors said overwhelmingly that they intended to leave their position within the next year. Furthermore, the lack of support these employees felt led to mistrust in the workplace. More than half of respondents to the survey said their unsupportive boss made it so they did not trust their employer overall. The survey revealed that one of the biggest ways managers could support their employees was by presenting them with clearly defined career development opportunities. Employees who received the chance to develop their skills accounted for 60 percent in the variance between supportive and unsupportive managers.

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